Department of Music Studies

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES

 

Course Descriptions


Historical and Systematic Musicology

Introduction to ancient Hellenic music

Code: ΜΟ27

A number of bone musical pipes (flutes) have been found in Neolithic (5000-3000 BC) sites of the Hellenic area. In the Bronze Age (3000-1000 BC), there is rich evidence of a vivid music life amongst the peoples of the ‘Cycladic’ civilization in the Cyclades, the ‘Minoan’ civilization in Crete, the ‘Mycenean’ civilization in the mainland, and the ‘Cypriot’ civilization in Cyprus. The available evidence on music activity becomes even richer from early Iron Age to the end of the Geometric period (1000-700 BC). The aim of the course is to introduce students to the methodology of Archaeomusicology, while at the same time informing them on the musical activity of the peoples of the Aegean in the aforementioned civilizations. Special attention is given to organology, the development and structure of musical instruments, the use of music in the various social activities, but also to external influences from abroad (Middle East, Egypt).

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC174/

Introduction to Historical and Systematic Musicology

Code: ΜΣ01

Presented and discussed are some topics of major importance for musicology, such as: the object and fields of musicology; the main concepts of musicology (form, genre, style); problems of periodization and methodology in music historiography; tonality and tonal systems; aesthetic and sociological parameters of music; music analysis and its relation to value judgment etc.

Theory and practice of renaissance music I

Code: ΜΟ72

In this two-semester course students are introduced to the contrapuntal ‒and, at times, homophonic‒ style of the great masters of the so-called “golden age of polyphony”, namely Palestrina, Orlando di Lasso, de Victoria, etc. The usual educational method of the Fuxian “species counterpoint” is not followed; instead, the students learn the fundamental principles of contrapunctus simplex (beginning with theoretical viewpoints of the 14th century), and the gradual transformation of such a basic structure to several versions of contrapunctus diminutus, through melodic embellishments. The students are asked to compose “free” 2-voice canonic passages in the way of Cantiones Duarum Vocum by Lasso, but also 3-voice or 4-voice passages against a given Cantus Firmus. In addition, the students are taught the fundamental principles of the contemporary theory (Tinctoris, Aaron, Glareanus, and mainly Zarlino) and, after becoming familiar with the several and divergent viewpoints about the modes, the concept of “tonal types”, the concepts of simultaneous and successive composition, as well as the differences between intervallic and chordal compositional practices, they analyze representative works of that period.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC218

Theory and practice of renaissance music II

Code: ΜΟ72

In this two-semester course students are introduced to the contrapuntal ‒and, at times, homophonic‒ style of the great masters of the so-called “golden age of polyphony”, namely Palestrina, Orlando di Lasso, de Victoria, etc. The usual educational method of the Fuxian “species counterpoint” is not followed; instead, the students learn the fundamental principles of contrapunctus simplex (beginning with theoretical viewpoints of the 14th century), and the gradual transformation of such a basic structure to several versions of contrapunctus diminutus, through melodic embellishments. The students are asked to compose “free” 2-voice canonic passages in the way of Cantiones Duarum Vocum by Lasso, but also 3-voice or 4-voice passages against a given Cantus Firmus. In addition, the students are taught the fundamental principles of the contemporary theory (Tinctoris, Aaron, Glareanus, and mainly Zarlino) and, after becoming familiar with the several and divergent viewpoints about the modes, the concept of “tonal types”, the concepts of simultaneous and successive composition, as well as the differences between intervallic and chordal compositional practices, they analyze representative works of that period.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC218

Theory and practice of tonal music (harmonic and structural analysis) Ι

Code: ΜΟ71

The aim of this two-semester course is to lead freshmen to develop a scientifically and historically founded perspective that will allow them to understand and experience the most important harmonic and structural procedures of tonal music through the examination of representative works from the baroque, the classic and the romantic eras. Among the main theoretical and analytical issues that are being studied in this course are the concepts of musical phrase, cadence and harmonic functions, tonicization and modulation, harmonic and structural rhythm, the reductive analytical method, the procedures of repetition, variation, development and contrast, as well as the structural types of sentence, period and some hybrids between them, along with the “small” ternary and binary models of organisation for a section of a broader music piece.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC217

Theory and practice of tonal music (harmonic and structural analysis) ΙΙ

Code: ΜΟ71

The aim of this two-semester course is to lead freshmen to develop a scientifically and historically founded perspective that will allow them to understand and experience the most important harmonic and structural procedures of tonal music through the examination of representative works from the baroque, the classic and the romantic eras. Among the main theoretical and analytical issues that are being studied in this course are the concepts of musical phrase, cadence and harmonic functions, tonicization and modulation, harmonic and structural rhythm, the reductive analytical method, the procedures of repetition, variation, development and contrast, as well as the structural types of sentence, period and some hybrids between them, along with the “small” ternary and binary models of organisation for a section of a broader music piece.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC217

History of modern Greek art music

Code: ΜΣ39

This course examines the characteristics of modern Greek music culture in relation to its ideals (the musical culture of Western European countries). The work of Greek composers is examined, starting from the Renaissance (Francesco Londariti), continuing with the Ionian School (19th and early 20th century), and the National School (from the early 20th century until about 1960). The examination concludes with the exploration of the latest trends in the European avant-garde music after the end of the Second World War, which include, in one way or another, the most important Greek composers, as well as the artistic and creative trends of the last 2-3 decades. Special emphasis is given to the investigation of the sources that provide us with information about modern Greek art music, as well as the relation of the musical developments with the general political and intellectual history of the country, the social conditions and the artistic conditions that influenced them.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC195/

Sociology of Music

Code: Μ234

An introduction to the sociological study of music, through a presentation and critical discussion of the work of some of its main representatives, such as Auguste Comte, Herbert Spencer, Georg Simmel, Jules Combarieu, Paul Bekker, Max Weber, Alfred Schutz, John Mueller, Alphons Silbermann, Kurt Blaukopf, Tia DeNora and, prominently, Theodor W. Adorno. Examined are such issues as, among others, the social formation of the materials, styles, forms and genres of music, the social role of the musician and the social function of music, the nature and development of musical institutions and audiences.

Form in European music Ι

Code: ΜΟ70

The subject matters of this course are divided into two semesters. In the first one, a variety of canons, fugues, choral preludes, variations (both strophic and double / alternating ones), minuet and scherzo forms, the main “rondo” forms (large ternary, rotational form, rondo and rondeau) as well as the binary forms of the baroque suite dances are being studied, before the sonata forms of the classic and romantic eras, the mixed rondo-sonata, rondeau-sonata and sonata-rondo forms, as well as the aria da capo, ritornello and the later sonata-concerto forms are being investigated in the second semester. The selected repertory of music ranges from the early 17th century until the middle 20th century and focuses on some of the most representative (mainly instrumental, but also a few vocal) compositions of the baroque, classic and romantic eras. Aim of the course is to assist students to acquire a solid knowledge of the basic music forms that have been applied by the composers in several major music genres during the aforementioned eras, from both a systematic and a historical perspective.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC292

Form in European music IΙ

Code: ΜΟ70

The subject matters of this course are divided into two semesters. In the first one, a variety of canons, fugues, choral preludes, variations (both strophic and double / alternating ones), minuet and scherzo forms, the main “rondo” forms (large ternary, rotational form, rondo and rondeau) as well as the binary forms of the baroque suite dances are being studied, before the sonata forms of the classic and romantic eras, the mixed rondo-sonata, rondeau-sonata and sonata-rondo forms, as well as the aria da capo, ritornello and the later sonata-concerto forms are being investigated in the second semester. The selected repertory of music ranges from the early 17th century until the middle 20th century and focuses on some of the most representative (mainly instrumental, but also a few vocal) compositions of the baroque, classic and romantic eras. Aim of the course is to assist students to acquire a solid knowledge of the basic music forms that have been applied by the composers in several major music genres during the aforementioned eras, from both a systematic and a historical perspective.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC293

Concise History of Music I

Code: ΜΜ94

This is a core course aimed at first-year students in the first two semesters of their studies and attempts to give them a concise picture of the Western European music history, from the Middle Ages to the 20th Century. The objective is to lay a historical foundation so that students can later specialize in the individual History courses and work out issues that require adequate knowledge of Music History. Despite the density of the material, the course serves as a good reference point for students in later years as well. It underlines the social and cultural conditions in which the course of music history takes place, the evolution of musical genres and forms, composition techniques, and important personalities that have left their permanent mark. Emphasis is also placed on the evolution of the musical style, but also on the position of composers in the their respective social environment. Each era is approached with representative musical examples, listened to during the course and analyzed briefly, in order to gain an understanding of the musical forms and structures within their historical development.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC210/

Concise History of Music II

Code: ΜΜ95

This is a core course aimed at first-year students in the first two semesters of their studies and attempts to give them a concise picture of the Western European music history, from the Middle Ages to the 20th Century. The objective is to lay a historical foundation so that students can later specialize in the individual History courses and work out issues that require adequate knowledge of Music History. Despite the density of the material, the course serves as a good reference point for students in later years as well. It underlines the social and cultural conditions in which the course of music history takes place, the evolution of musical genres and forms, composition techniques, and important personalities that have left their permanent mark. Emphasis is also placed on the evolution of the musical style, but also on the position of composers in the their respective social environment. Each era is approached with representative musical examples, listened to during the course and analyzed briefly, in order to gain an understanding of the musical forms and structures within their historical development.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC210/

Aesthetics and philosophy of Music

Code: ΜΟ35

Music has been the subject of philosophical thought since antiquity. In modern times the study of music has been linked to the meaning and practices of the musical work of art and the idea of the autonomy of art. Starting from these newer concepts, the lecture examines a series of central themes of music aesthetics, in a historical order and systematic orientation: the relationship of music with the higher cognitive-practical abilities of imagination, intellect and speech (Kant), music as an art of interiority and in contrast to the other arts (Hegel), music as an objectification of the metaphysical origin of the world (Schopenhauer), music as an expression of emotion and as a "sound-moving form" (Hanslick), music as a spatial and temporal object and the problem of the ontology of the musical work (Ingarden), human musicality from the point of view of philosophical anthropology (Plessner), music as a symbolic system (Langer), music as a living dialectic and as a critical integration of the social (Adorno).

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC440/

Harmonic theory of ancient Hellenic music

Code: ΜΣ80

‘Harmonics’ is the science of the tonal (as opposed to temporal) component of musical melody, according to ancient theoreticians (Aristoxenos, Ptolemaios, Kleoneidēs etc). It investigates the parts which compose melody (pitches, intervals, systems, genera, keys) and their interrelations. The purpose of harmonics was the discovery of the ‘nature’ (physis) of melody, and its description in appropriate terms. The right ‘use’ (chrēsis) of these melodic parts during composition (melopoiia), leads to the desired ‘ethical character’ (ēthos) of the melody. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the philosophical thinking of the ancient Hellenes as regards the conception of the tonal component of melody, and to enhance the realization in them that ancient Hellenic harmonics constitute the foundation ground of the later Byzantine and European music theories.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC208/

Gregorian Chant

Code: ΜΣ84

The history of music tradition from the first Christian centuries to our day. The first forms of christian chant, psalms and hymns. Local repertories: Old Roman chant, Ambrosian chant, Gallican chant, Beneventan chant, Mozarabic chant, Byzantine chant ecc.. The formation of the Gregorian chant and its relationship with the local music traditions. The music theory of cantus planus. The liturgical year, the liturgical books and the chant these contain. The theoreticians of the Middle Ages, and the information we draw from the theoretical treatises of the period, concerning the performance of Gregorian chant. Birth and development of the neumatic notation, families of neumes, examination of the main music manuscripts. Transcriptions from medieval manuscripts. Music examples.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC141/

Choral Conducting I (Winter Semester)

Code: ΜΜ107

The course juxtaposes the foundational myths to the available written sources on music and offers a historical outline of the major phases in the development of Ottoman music. The lectures cover an array of topics that include the patronage of musicians and musical performance, the principal forms, the musical, poetic and compositional models, and the system of teaching and transmission of the music repertoire. In addition, the course emphasises the ideological and aesthetic aspects of the transformation of Ottoman musical tradition in its modern form during the transition from the Ottoman Empire to the modern Turkish state.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC236

Choral Conducting II (Spring Semester)

Code: ΜΜ108

The overall aim of the course is to introduce undergraduate students to the special aspects of Ottoman musical culture and to the central aesthetic and political issues that pertain to the historical development of the musical genre.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC236

20th and 21st century operas and musicals

Code: Μ266

Α concise view of mainly the 20th century opera and musical. Issues covered: · The characteristics of the operatic reform and the "Zeitoper" during the Weimar Republic, focusing on the operas by Β. Brecht – Κ. Weill. · The African-American musical and theatrical genres: their influence on the American musical and on operas of the interwar period. Scott Joplin’s opera Treemonisha and Ernst Krenek’s opera Jonny spielt auf. · 20th century operatic works established as part of the standard repertory (operas by Debussy, Janacek a.o.). The historical and theoretical characteristics of 20th century operas: · expressionistic drama (Schoenberg's operas and especially Alban Berg’s Wozzecκ and Lulu), tendencies in the movement of operatic neoclassicism: Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Ravel, Britten, Menotti. · Most important are operas based on ancient Greek drama: Richard Strauss’ Elektra, Igor Stravinsky’s Oedipus Rex, the respective operas by Carl Orff a.o. · The historical and theoretical elements of the American and the English musical are also discussed, focusing in detail on the outstanding musical West Side Story. · Further: Character and extensions of the musical theatre in the 20th and 21st century. Post-war forms and experimental tendencies in the field of musical theatre: Mauricio Kagel and the Instrumental Theatre, multi-media operas, post-modern trends etc.

Repertory operas and operettas

Code: Μ263

Through historical references, documentation and commentary, this course aims at pointing out the characteristics of mainly the opera and operetta, mainly focusing on certain works of the repertory. Lectures describe the nature of musical theatre, opera’s major principles, as well as the historical and genre characteristics throughout its major phases from its beginnings up to the 20th century. Issues covered: Musical Theatre, Dramatic Theatre, Opera: distinctions and definitions. Function and role of opera and operetta singers. The myth of Orpheus from Monteverdi to Gluck G.F. Händel and operas of the Baroque era The operas of W.A. Mozart, Opera seria – Opera buffa 19th century French opera (Grand opéra - Opéra comique- Opéra lyrique) Romantic opera in Germany and Heinrich Marschner’s gothic opera «Der Vampyr». Notes on Richard Wagner’s music dramas. Italian opera: Bel Canto and romanticism: Rossini - Donizetti – Bellini and the Bel canto revival by Maria Callas. Verdi and Italian nationalism Operatic Verismo: From Bizet’s “Carmen” to Puccini’s “Turandot”. Τhe first and the late phase of European operetta. The course also includes references on the history of Greek opera and operetta.

Special topics in music history: Music of the Late Renaissance

Code: Μ293

The course focuses on the study of the last part of the Renaissance which is characterized by an ever-increasing systematic attempt to render the text (religious and secular) through music. On the occasion of the selective study of works by Palestrina, G. Gabrieli, and others, we will first get in touch with the two most important art centers in Italy (Rome-Venice) and we will get to know the differences between them, which are clearly identified not only on an artistic level but also on an ideological level, as well. In particular, as far as the latter is concerned, this dimension is sufficiently felt after a careful look at the political organization of the two cities, which is based on two completely different centers of power. At the same time, we will explore the environment of patronage and music publishers, as well as that of the most important church music institutions of the time. Particular emphasis will also be placed on the north Italian madrigal after 1575, which is now becoming the most important species capable of highlighting the synthetic abilities of composers.

Special Subjects on Music: Baroque (1600-1750)

Code: Μ248

Due to its large time span (1600-1750), the baroque era is generally divided into three periods. To make baroque phenomenon understandable, our study begins with the examination of the High Renaissance period that preceded it, leading from polyphony to monody, the development of which was necessary to create the music drama. In addition to the main types of vocal music (Madrigal, concerted Motet, Oratorio, Opera, etc.), major types of organic music (Concerto, Sonata, Fuga, etc.) are also considered, always in relation to secular and ecclesiastical centers of power of the period.

Practice listening skills

Code: ΜΜ103

The aim of this practical course is to cultivate the listening skills of students, so that they are able to recognize individual intervals and chords and also wider harmonic sequences and descending formations. On the other hand students learnh how to write one or two consecutive melodic lines on the on the staves. Special emphasis is also given to the possibility of perceiving melodic and harmonic formations in relation to their functional role in the respective tonal context

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC184

Theory and Aesthetics of 20th century music

Code: Μ269

Exploring characteristic works of 20th century music composers, the course seeks answers to the following fundamental questions: What are the components of the formation of synthetic ideas in new music and with what musical-theoretical and music-philosophical conceptual tools can they be described?

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC424/

History of Orchestration (Orchestration I)

Code: ΜΟ47

Approach to the evolution of orchestral writing: distribution of musical texture elements among orchestral groups, relationships of groups between them, development of orchestration along with technical developments of the instruments, solo use of several instruments, development of orchestral practices and techniques such as divisi and non divisi chords, natural and artificial harmonics, pizzicati and so on. on the strings, breath and tongue on the winds, sound-color combinations, balance of volume, the evolution of the use of percussions etc. (Score excerpts by Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Wagner, Liszt, Bruckner, Tchaikovsky, Mahler, R. Strauss, Stravinsky and others.)

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC238

History of European musical instruments

Code: ΜΟ52

In this course, after a basic presentation of the acoustics of sound generation in musical instruments and of different principles of the classification of musical instruments, the main groups of musical instruments according to Hornbostel-Sachs are dealt with under historical aspects. We will consider the characteristic features of instruments belonging to these groups with respect to construction, playing technique and their use in music from the Middle Ages to present times.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC431/

Music analysis Ι: Cases of cyclic form and programme music

Code: ΜΜ57

The present course extends the knowledge gained from the courses “Theory and practice of tonal music” and “Form in European music” towards two parallel directions in the repertoire of the baroque, classic and romantic eras. The first direction concerns various cases of works written in cyclic form and, in particular, compositions which either consist of two or more movements that are thematically interconnected or comprise a compound movement that more or less assimilates the form and the character of a sequence of different movements. The other direction lies in cases of works of programme music, where it is examined how but also to what extent the extra-musical content exerts its influence on the purely musical form (or, conversely, how the latter one can be manipulated by the composers in order to serve at the same time the respective programmatic context).

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC448

Musical analysis III - synthetic practices in 20th century music

Code: Μ260

The aim of this course is to get acquainted with the various compositional techniques in 20th century music and the different analytical methods that approach them. Based on selected representative works of music of this historical period fundamental issues, techniques and problems of analysis of new music, that arise not only from the score of the composition but also from the interpretation of the musical work will be examined.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC389/

Palaeography of Music

Code: ΜΟ25

The development of music notation from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. Byzantine and Western neumatic notation up to the 14thcentury.The primitive notation of the first polyphonic compositions. The black square notation: Ars antiqua and Ars Nova. The white mensural notation of the Renaissance. The notation system of instrumental music in the Renaissance. Music and typography. Transcriptions from Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts. Music examples.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC140/

Ιssues of musical composition I: Musical setting, Tonality and Modality

Code: Μ264

In this course presented and discussed are: Ιssues of tonal fields and directions, tonal, diatonic modal and pentatonic material: sonority and tonal environments of the diatonic modes, movement and resonance, pandiatonicism, repetitiveness and minimalism. Melos – poetry, melody – text and accentuation: choices and technical issues. Song-form/ Song- style, semi-classical/ crossover and large musical forms: signs and symbols. Commentaries and notes on works by: Μοzart, Prokofiev, Ravel, Stravinsky, Copland, Weill, Lou Harrison, Ligeti, Paert, Loui Andriessen, Steve Reich, John Adams, Lyle Mays, Joni Mitchell, Frank Zappa, Hatzidakis, Björk, Platonos, a.o.

Introduction to Greek and Latin Palaeography

Code: ΜΟ37

The Hellenic book script: The capital script from the fourth to the ninth centuries. The transition from the capital to the minuscule script. The minuscule script from the ninth to the fifteenth centuries. Analytical study of the hand-written book (manuscript). General historical survey of the Latin script. Reading hellenic and latin manuscripts (exercises).

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC139/

Orchestration II

Code: ΜΣ63

The evolution of orchestration from the late romantic period (ca 1880) to the World War II, a special view of woodwinds and their use, orchestration exercises for woodwinds (and French horn).

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC252

Ιssues of musical composition II: Chromatic and alternative material, Μetrum - Rhythm - Pulse, Score set-up

Code: Μ265

Basic knowledge of instrumentation and orchestration is required in order to follow this elective course. Specific issues covered: Modes of chromatic character, symmetric scales, atonal and alternative material, polychords and polytonality: examples and combinations. From impressionsm and expressionism to tone clusters, sound textures and micropolyphony. Works by Debussy, Ravel, Messiaen, Bartók, Milhaud, Ginastera, Lutoslawski, Cage, Ligeti, Scelsi, Schnittke, Crumb, Frank Zappa, Mc Phee, Reich, Adams, Andriessen, Αzimuth a.o. Meter – Rhythm – Pulse: Two - beat and three- beat rhythms. Rhythm, pulse and beat: repetitive unambiguous rhythmic textures and polyrhythms, multidirectionality and polymeters. Examples of European and American music. Score set-up: Creative aspects, handling and notation of musical terms and instruments arranged in sections (strings, wind, brass, percussion) towards the range of musical instruments .

The Symphony Orchestra after 1950

Code: ΜΟ82

Listening to characteristic symphonic works of this period, formulation of criteria “critical and conscious listening”, detailed presentation of the various idioms and schools, systematic view to their application to orchestration.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC251

Chamber Music I

Code: Μ294

Study of works from the Repertoire of Chamber Music of the Great Tradition of Art Music – the course can be taken by students selected by audition and is completed with a concert at the end of winter semester.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC444

Chamber Music II

Code: Μ295

Study of works from the Repertoire of Chamber Music of the Great Tradition of Art Music – the course can be taken by students selected by audition and is completed with a concert at the end of spring semester.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC445

Musicological research, digital documents and the internet

Code: Μ268

The aim of the course is to provide knowledge on issues related to the use of modern technology in musicological research. Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to utilize digital skills such as searching, cataloguing, evaluating and managing digital documents, while utilizing Internet technologies. The content of the course includes modules such as Digital Libraries, Databases, digital document management, copyright management, metadata and music librarianship, remote research, markup languages for the world wide web, etc.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC195/

Music Palaeography: Old Byzantine Notations

Code: ΜΜ53

Birth and development of the notation in Byzantium. Ekphonetic notation, local notations, palaeobyzantine notations, middlebyzantine (round) notation. Transcriptions from byzantine manuscripts with middlebyzantine notation. Music examples.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC142/

Rhythmic theory of ancient Hellenic music

Code: ΜΜ55

‘Rhythmics’ is the science of the temporal (as opposed to tonal) component of musical melody. It was developed systematically by Aristoxenos in the 4th c. BC. The course aims at introducing the students to the philosophical thinking of Aristoxenos as regards the conception of the temporal (rhythmic) component of melody, and to enhance the realization in them that ancient Hellenic rhythmics constitute the foundation ground of the later Byzantine and European rhythmic theories.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC158/

Notation of ancient Hellenic music

Code: ΜΣ56

Ever since the 4th c. BC (perhaps, even the 5th c. BC), the ancient Hellenes had invented and used a notation system (parasēmantikē) for writing down their music. There were ‘signs’ (sēmeia) representing pitches, alphabetic in form, and signs indicating durations. Two notation systems existed side by side, one for vocal music (sēmeialexeōs) and one for instrumental soli (sēmeiakrouseōs). The vocal signs were placed above the syllables, and above them, the rhythmic signs. Our main sources of information on the subject are the theoretical threatises of Aristeidēs Kointilianos (On music), Alypios (Introduction to music), and the Anonymi Bellermann (Art of music). All extant music, in papyrus, stone, or medieval manuscripts, is recorded in this notation system. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the ancient Hellenic music notation system, as this is presented and discussed in our sources, and applied to the surviving scores.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC203/

Elementary Conductor’s Technique

Code: ΜΣ77

The several types of orchestras and the evolution of their repertoire in the European tradition of art music, brief history of the role of the conductor, systematic practice in the conductor’s technique.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC235

Choir I

Code: Μ291

This is an optional course that is addressed to all students of the Department. During the course, the students are trained in vocal techniques, vocal placement, and proper breathing, as well as selected short examples of the repertoire from all periods of music history. The students participate in the Department Choir and are required to perform in music events organized by the Department or the University of Athens.

Choir II

Code: Μ292

This is an optional course that is addressed to all students of the Department. During the course, the students are trained in vocal techniques, vocal placement, and proper breathing, as well as selected short examples of the repertoire from all periods of music history. The students participate in the Department Choir and are required to perform in music events organized by the Department or the University of Athens.

Digital score and electronic publications

Code: Μ229

The aim of the course is to examine the challenges and opportunities that are derived from the use of digital score in the hands of the modern musicologist. The ability to digitally edit the score brought such potential, that gradually impose digital scores as the best means for writing music. From the field of historical musicology, examined issues include dating the score, identifying the composer, investigating the authenticity of the work, copyright issues, etc. From the field of computational musicology, examined topics include the contribution of symbolic representation of music (such as MusicXML semantic language) in the field of interoperability, and the rapid spread of digital score thanks to Open Source Software. Regarding the utilization of new technologies in education, digital score is considered as a means of cultivating creativity. After completing the course students will be able, among other, to write music on the computer using score editing applications.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC375/

Musical Criticism in Theory and Practice

Code: Μ296

As regards theory, we examine the three main aspects of musical criticism: description, interpretation and evaluation, with special emphasis on evaluation as the final goal of criticism. Relatedly we discuss some major theories of artistic value, including those of Hume, Kant, Hanslick, Beardsley, Adorno and Dahlhaus. As regards practice, we introduce and analyze in terms of aims, strategies and style texts by major representatives of music criticism.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC296/

Symphony Orchestra I

Code: Μ239

For students-members of the Athens Youth Symphony Orchestra (ΑΣΟΝ) during the winter semester.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC383

Symphony Orchestra II

Code: Μ240

For students-members of the Athens Youth Symphony Orchestra (ΑΣΟΝ) during the spring semester.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/couses/MUSIC384


Ethnomusicology and Cultural Anthropology

Ethnomusicology I

Code: ΜΣ02

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the definition, scope, and methods of Ethnomusicology. Through a survey of its history, the course explores the relationship of Ethnomusicology with Historical and Systematic Musicology, as well as current tendencies in the discipline.

Ethnomusicology II

Code: ΜΜ97

The course covers the development of the field of ethnomusicology since the mid 20th century to the present. This period is defined by the focus on the study of music “in culture and as culture”, following the influence of modern anthropological theory and the method of ethnographic enquiry on ethnomusicology. The course emphasises the shift from the study of music to the study of sound and its interrelation to space, material culture and the constitution of social and cultural identities. Through a wide range of different musical and sonic practices the course analyses the relation between music and sound, and social structures, as well as how this relationship changes and is transformed due to the impact of technology, globalization and migration. The overall aim of the course is to introduce undergraduate students to the modern theoretical, methodological and practical trends within the field of ethnomusicology, and to the current discussion and debates reflected in the relevant literature.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC397/

Greek folk musical instruments

Code: ΜΣ74

The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the width and variety of Greek folk musical instruments. The first part of the course includes a general introduction to the uses and symbolisms of traditional instruments, through examples derived from various historical periods and musical cultures, in relation to myth and ritual, gender and social class, cultural networks, tradition and modernity. The second part presents the main systems of classification and the “families” of folk instruments, and underscores their differentiations from the instruments of the “classical” orchestra. The most important instruments and combinations ('zygies' and 'kompanies') from land and sea Greece are presented and analytically investigated in categories: memvranofona, aerofona, hordofona, idiofona, sound objects). The course will also include live performances (examples of techniques of play and basic repertoire from various areas) by invited eminent folk musicians, and film shows on the techniques of instrument's construction. A conducted tour to the Museum of Greek Folk Instruments will also take place.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC187/

Greek folk music

Code: ΜΣ06

The course investigates the history, structure, content, and functions of Greek folk music. Musical tradition is approached as a unity of lyrics-melody-movement (song-music-dance), in combination with its symbolic codes and functions. Special emphasis is given on the elements of orality and improvisation, as well as on the clarification of the terms: traditional, popular, folk and ethnic. Having the Samuel Baud-Bovy research as point of departure, we will study the history of Greek traditional music from the antiquity until our days, underscoring continuities and ruptures, external influences and mutual exchanges, through cultural networks of communication between East and West. The “musical map of Hellenism” is outlined, through the distinction between land and sea traditions as far as the scales, rhythms, instruments, and the music making structure are concerned, in combination with representative sound samples from all areas, kinds, and types of repertoire. Special reference to the function of sound and music in the shadow theatre is made, a specific synthesis of arts that leads to the creation of the Greek folk “opera”.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC186/

Cultural and music anthropology II

Code: ΜΜ78

After having completed a review of the key concepts, methods, and subjects of study of cultural anthropology, in this course we will focus οn the anthropological study of music. More specifically, we will study music from the point of view of anthropology, as a social and cultural phenomenon, which shapes and is shaped by social relations, cultural identities, and meanings. Through various ethnographic examples, we will investigate the main theoretical orientations (e.g. interpretive phenomenology and ethnographic criticism) and issues (e.g. gender, ethnic and national identities, body and senses, globalization), which are central in the anthropological approaches of music.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC212/

Cultural and music anthropology I

Code: ΜΟ59

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the subjects of study, methodologies, and products of work of cultural anthropology. More analytically, we will make an historical review of key concepts, methods, questions, topics and tendencies in anthropologists' effort to understand culture in historical as well as in global perspectives. Through various ethnographic examples we will explore topics that are central in contemporary cultural anthropological thought: culture and meaning, language and communication, social construction of identity and reality, cultural aspects of social and economic hierarchies. Although anthropology shares its theory with other disciplines, it is distinguished from them for its emphasis on the ethnographic method (participant observation and in-depth empirical study of cultural groups), as well as for its research and writing aspects.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC321/

Arabian-Persian music

Code: ΜΜ40

Main purpose of this course is the induction of the students in issues about the constitution, the culture and the development of “classic” Arabian and Persian music, which its development took place mainly in the aristocrats’ courtyards (Medina, Damascus, Bagdad) at the time of the Middle Ages. The role of religion in the development of hymnody, the relationship of language and music, the musical theory and the tonal system, the musical notation and aesthetics, the instruments and the composition of music ensembles, as well as the effects with the musical theory of Ancient Greek, constitute certain from the thematic units that are examined. The lectures are accompanied by musically examples.

Urban folk music

Code: ΜΟ17

We will investigate the course, structure, content, and functions of Greek urban folk music, with special emphasis on the tradition of rebetiko. Reference will be made to the urban folk culture and its main characteristics in the cities of modern Greece, especially to the musical life of Athens during the 19th century, and to the musical tradition of the two important cities of Hellenism, Smyrni and Constantinople. From the controversy between “kafe-aman” and “kafe-santan” and the prehistory of rebetico, we move on to the first historical period of “prison and teke” (until 1922). We then examine the “classical” period (1922-1940), the contribution of refugees in the formation of rebetiko, and the transition from the school of “Smyrni” to the school of “Piraeus”. Special emphasis is given on the work and personality of Markos Vamvakaris, on the role of discography, and on the implications of the censorship of the Ioannis Metaxa junta. The historical review of rebetiko is completed with the “workers'” period (1945-1955), during which the 'catharsis' of the genre took place. This period is signaled by Vassilis Tsitsanis and the innovations he introduced in the songs' structure and function, and by Manolis Hiotis, who established the four-chord bouzouki. Finally, we will examine the impact of the tradition of rebetiko on the development of Greek song, and we will make a brief review of “folk” song during the decade 1955-1965 (through the “Kazatzidis-Bithikotsis” polar), and of the new kind of folk song (“artistic folk”) that Manos Hatzidakis and Mikis Theodorakis established.

Ethnographic approaches to the performing arts

Code: ΜΜ81

This course investigates the notion of “performance” in relation to the performing arts (especially music and theatre), and to relevant theories. Performance theories derive from various disciplines: cultural studies, social/cultural anthropology, theatre studies. During lectures we will analyze particular performances, and we will investigate the ways in which ethnographic research, that is, participant observation and active engagement of the researcher in his/her field of research, contributes to an understanding of various theatrical and musical traditions, as well as the ways in which performance theories affect ethnographic theory and practice. Special emphasis will be given on the role of the performing arts in the construction of various identities and communities, and the means though which they achieve it.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC320/

Ethnographic Cinema and Documentary

Code: ΜΟ81

The course “Ethnographic Cinema and Documentary” covers various theoretical issues on the subjects of reality cinema and fiction, film studies and ethnography, visual and media anthropology, ethnomusicological films and music documentaries. As part of the lectures, the films Nanook of the North (Robert Flaherty, 1922), Man with a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929), La Chasse de Lion avec l’Arc (Jean Rouch, 1966), Άre Άre Music (Hugo Zemp, 1979) and Amir: An Afghan Refugee Musician’s Life in Peshawar, Pakistan (John Baily, 1985) are ethnographically and critically analyzed. The course is supported by audiovisual examples while students’ grades are calculated on the basis of an assignment and written exams.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC148/

Introduction to rhythm and metrics (accompaniment with percussion instruments)

Code: Μ284

This is an introductory course aimed at students with basic knowledge of folk percussion instruments which attempts to give them an overview of Greek traditional music rhythms, a good level of knowledge of the notation system that concerns these instruments, as well as a first acquaintance with musicological research.

History and methodology in Greek traditional music research

Code: Μ227

Through this course, students are introduced to issues related to the research of Greek folk music. In matters of theory, on the one hand, and of practical nature, on the other. The first axis of the course is a brief historical review of the relevant research in Greece, which will be included in a general discussion of local and international theoretical trends in the field of research on popular music culture. The second is about the tools used by a researcher in the field. Through a combination of theoretical presentation and practical application, issues such as the interview methodology, the methodology and practices of audiovisual field recording (recording, photography, cinematography) and the processing and classification of raw material will be examined.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC350

Applied Ethnomusicology

Code: Μ213

The course “Applied Ethnomusicology” examines practical and public dimensions of ethnomusicology outside the academic context through participatory action research (e.g. ethnomusicology and community music, ethnomusicology and education, ethnomusicology and cultural policy, ethnomusicology and conflict management, ethnomusicology and vulnerable social groups, ethnomusicology and development programs, ethnomusicology and the media). This approach aims at creating a balance between ethnomusicological teaching, research and active social involvement by educational, cultural, political, computational, artistic or activist means. The course is supported by further educational material and case studies while students’ grades are calculated on the basis of an assignment and written exams.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC327/

Indian music

Code: ΜΜ44

India was always a station one of the most ancient cultures of humanity. Main purpose of this course is the induction of the students in issues about the constitution, the culture and the development of “classic” Indian music, which its development took place mainly in the aristocrats’ courtyards. The role of religion in the development of Vedic hymnody, the relationship of language and music, the musical theory and the accentual system, the musical notation and aesthetics, the composition of music ensembles as well as the effects with other musical cultures, as the Arabs and Persians, constitute certain from the thematic units that are examined. The lectures are accompanied by musically examples.

Music Ensembles (instrumental and vocal) of Greek traditional music

Code: Μ285

The aim of this practical course is to promote cooperation among the students, cultivating their individual musical skills such as dynamics, phrasing, consistency, rhythmic solo. The small music groups that will be created will be invited to perform a repertoire of anonymous Greek songs and organic purposes.

Music Ensembles of popular music

Code: Μ286

As in the previous course, the students will be invited to create small music groups, based on the musical instruments they can perform, but also to experiment, combining instruments from different musical cultures. The aim of the course is, among other things, the development of orchestration skills and the familiarity with the creation and elaboration of a musical score by the participants.

Musical biographies

Code: Μ225

Biography is taught as ethnographic research and writing. A distinction is made between the literary genre of biography and ethnographic biography. Students undertake to produce biographies of musicians in accordance with the theory and methodology of ethnomusicology and cultural anthropology. They are asked to inquire into and write on the double identity of the musician in a biography as performer and member of a particular society. Students also write about the literary relationship of the biographer qua maker of the biography with the person that is the object of the biography. Musical biography is juxtaposed to other kinds of biography, thus broadening the scope of biographical discourse.

Musical traditions of the Middle East

Code: Μ254

The course is an introduction to the various musical traditions of the Middle East, focusing on the principal dynasties of the Islamic world and on their historical relationships. The course offers and thorough survey of the historical Arabic, Persian and Ottoman sources on musical theory and practice, and covers wide range of topics that include the special historical, social and cultural features that shaped the diverse musical traditions in the area, the status and role of musicians across different historical and social contexts, as well as the relationship between music and other forms of artistic expression. The overall aim of the course is to introduce undergraduate students to a very significant aspect of the cultural history of the Middle East and to foreground the geographical and linguistic pluralism, as well as the interaction and the historical continuities and discontinuities among the various musical traditions.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/TURKMAS225/

Musical identities and Internet ethnography

Code: Μ170

Anthropology has rather ignored popular culture in general and popular music in particular, although it consists an integral part of people's everyday lives. Nowadays, however, anthropologists and ethnomusicologists are increasingly interested in the study of contemporary urban, western communities and in the exploration of phenomena such as globalization and the transcendence of clearly defined musical and cultural boundaries. Anthropology’s main contribution to the interdisciplinary, international, and significantly developed field of contemporary popular music, is the ethnographic investigation of the musical experiences of people who make and listen to the music in specific historical and cultural contexts. Through ethnographic examples from various musical cultures (rock, pop, EDM, hip hop etc.), we will explore issues like the relationship between humans and technology, ethnic and gender identities, migration and diasporas. Special emphasis will be given on the study of online musical communities, and on the new theoretical and methodological questions raised by the anthropological/ethnographic research in the Internet.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC211/

Music cultures of the Mediterranean: North Africa

Code: ΜΜ116

the course introduces an ethnomusicological and anthropological approach to the study of several musical cultures of the Mediterranean. The scientific interest examines the relationship between music and culture through the application of theoretical and methodological tools on various examples of ethnomusicological field research. Moreover, by examining a variety of music ethnographies and by listening to specific musical examples, the course explores the areas of: i) Morocco, focusing on the Gnawa and Tuareg musical genre and trance rituals, ii) Tunisia, focusing on the Stambeli musical genre, iii) Algeria, focusing on the Rai musical genre connected to the Algerian immigrants in Paris, iv) The Arab-Andalusian musical heritage to several north african countries v) Egypt, focusing on religious and popular music.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC271/

Music cultures of the Mediterranean: South Europe

Code: ΜΜ121

The geographical area of the Mediterranean, consists of a variety of different cultures, connected to an extended historical past which is characterized by multidimensional economic, social and cultural changes. The specific changes rose the academic interest both in the field of social studies (history, sociology, anthropology), as well as in the field of science studies (geography, geology, biology, medicine). The course introduces an ethnomusicological and anthropological approach to the study of several musical cultures of the Mediterranean. The scientific interest examines the relationship between music and culture through the application of theoretical and methodological tools on various examples of ethnomusicological field research. Moreover, by examining a variety of music ethnographies and by listening to specific musical examples, the course explores the areas of: i)Iberian peninsula, focused on the genres of fados (Portugal) and flamenco (Spain),ii) polyphonic musical traditions of Sardinia, Corsica and Malta, iii) Southern Italy, focused on the cases of the Grecophone villages and napolitan tradition, iv) ethnomusicological Greek ethnographies.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC284/

World Music

Code: Μ222

In this course we will focus on the musics of Latin America. We will start with a short introduction to the social and political dimension of Latin American history from the discovery of the continent in 1492 till the complete European colonization and the decisive social/cultural and musical influence of the transatlantic African slave trade. We will study musical ethnographies about the musics of the Caribbean (rumba, son, salsa), of Brazil (capoeira, candomblé, samba) and the great tradition of Argentinian tango. Finally, we will discuss the musical traditions of Peru. Thematically we will be dealing with the relation between music and race/nationality, music and politics and music and globalization.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC348/

Music and Improvisation

Code: Μ250

The term improvisation describes a wide range of practices and genres that vary among different musical traditions worldwide. A feature shared by these diverse traditions is the creation of music “in the course of performance”. The course examines improvisation from an ethnomusicological perspective and focuses on its diverse expressions and practices on cross-cultural level. Through a survey of different improvisatory genres and traditions (oral epic traditions from Africa and the Middle East, art musics of Asia, contemporary improvisation etc.) the course examines the limits between musical (re)composition and performance, the role of orality and literacy in the creation of music, the process of initiation and of learning of improvisatory techniques, the perceptions regarding freedom and creativity, as well as the social and cultural connotation of improvisation in musical communities that constitute their identities on the basis of improvisatory practices. The overall aim of the course in to introduce undergraduate students to the musical and conceptual diversity of improvisation and to the methodologies in studying improvisatory practices on cross-cultural level.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC388/

Music and Cinema: Anthropological Approaches

Code: ΜΜ86

The course “Music and Cinema: Anthropological Approaches” studies the relation between music and the moving pictures through historical and anthropological perspective. It explores relevant issues such as scene music, music for silent and sound films (practices, functions and usages), contemporary theoretical and methodological models of film music analysis, film music genres, film soundtrack and performance theory, as well as the novel academic disciplines of anthropology of film music and film (ethno)musicology. The course is supported by audiovisual examples while students’ grades are calculated on the basis of an assignment and written exams.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC226/

Music transcription and analysis in ethnomusicology

Code: Μ148

Music transcription and analysis constitute two of the most significant tools of Ethnomusicology for the investigation of the tone systems and morphology characteristics of oral musical idioms or traditions. The objective of the course is to teach students how to use the methods of transcription and analysis and familiarize them with the particular issues that arise from the notation of sound due to the particularities of different musical idioms.

Music, Dance and Politics

Code: ΜΜ131

This course examines the different ways in which the performing arts of music and dance are involved with politics in various historical and cultural contexts. Methodologically we will be engaged with historical records and ethnographies. Theoretically we will discuss how cultural studies, social studies and anthropology in particular have been studying the relation between politics and social movements. Thematically we will examine the relationship between dance/music and politics in totalitarian regimes in Europe, the politics of Nation States of promoting one particular musical traditions, and with contemporary political involvement of musical genres in Greece

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC175/

Ottoman Musical Tradition

Code: Μ249

The course examines the art musical tradition of the Ottoman Empire that developed initially under the patronage of the Ottoman Court and of certain Sufi brotherhoods and expanded since the 18th century into the major urban cities of the empire (Constatinople, Smyrna and Salonika), attracting into its circles musicians from the various non-Muslim communities (Rum/Greek Orthodox, Jews, Armenians). In addition, the course covers the transformation and integration of Ottoman urban music into the institutions for music education and performance that were founded by the modern Turkish state since its establishment (1923). The course juxtaposes the foundational myths to the available written sources on music and offers a historical outline of the major phases in the development of Ottoman music. The lectures cover an array of topics that include the patronage of musicians and musical performance, the principal forms, the musical, poetic and compositional models, and the system of teaching and transmission of the music repertoire. In addition, the course emphasises the ideological and aesthetic aspects of the transformation of Ottoman musical tradition in its modern form during the transition from the Ottoman Empire to the modern Turkish state. The overall aim of the course is to introduce undergraduate students to the special aspects of Ottoman musical culture and to the central aesthetic and political issues that pertain to the historical development of the musical genre.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC194/

Organization and Management of Ethnomusicological Archives

Code: Μ212

The course “Organization and Management of Ethnomusicological Archives” explores the basic principles of (music) librarianship and organization of ethnomusicological material, from research to dissemination, in major thematic sections such as ethnomusicology and archives, ethnomusicology and museums, ethnomusicology and libraries, ethnomusicological records and taxonomic systems, modern databases in ethnomusicology etc. In this context, diverse tools related to the creation and management of various forms of data (written, oral, visual, audio and audiovisual) are presented and applied. The course is supported by further educational material and case studies while students’ grades are calculated on the basis of an assignment and written exams.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC326/

Music and the sacred

Code: ΜΜ113

Like music, the expression of sacred experience is a fundamental manifestation of humanity encountered across time, space and modality. The notion of the sacred is defined in three distinct yet related registers of interpretation. The first discourse on the sacred pertains to common knowledge; the second, to ethnomusicological and anthropological projects; and the third, on auto-narration, i.e. the telling of a personal experience by students themselves. The framework of analysis includes interpretations of the sacred in the domains of experience, expression and communication, with a special focus on music. The ethnographic examples of the course refer to a wide range of sacred traditions such as Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, Sufism, and Shamanism.

Greek Music Maps - Music networks

Code: Μ220

What is geography, if it is not the drawing and interpretation of lines (Olssen, 1992). However, the border is not a popular term, especially today when we are more scientifically interested in liquidity and plasticity, in breaking down the lines between art and everyday life, in the multiplicity of identities, but mainly in a world that is constantly mixing 'here' with 'there'. And in this game of mixing, space, that is constantly culturally produced and reproduced, plays a leading role. Music in turn is the ultimate spatial enabler with the ability to give people to structure it and sometimes make it their 'place', as it has access to the grid of memory and emotion, it works in broader cultural context and is a useful tool for multiple forms of expression. The ways in which music crosses natural geography and gives meaning to the structured space through the experiences of our people introduces us, in a way, to a higher level of human geography within the science of ethnomusicology. These ways are the mechanism that we will discover to function as a cohesive web between the local folk music traditions of Hellenism and their modern performance in many different contexts - components of the platform that creates and develops the Greek music communities and networks. That way we will look at how multiple and multi-level music maps can be created.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC350/

Theory and practice of Greek traditional music

Code: Μ287

The course is intended for students who wish to acquire essential knowledge of the basic terms, symbols, concepts and functions of the Greek traditional music theory. Starting with the notes, the rhythm, the expression and continuing with the intervals, the scales and the chords, students are encouraged to consolidate what they have learned through singing, instrumental use, acoustic exercises and composition.


Sound Technology

Introduction to music psychology

Code: ΜΜ37

This compulsory 2nd-year module examines the field of music psychology through the lens of systematic musicology, which has been taught during the 1st year. We firstly introduce the science of psychology and its research methods, we then talk about music perception, music cognition, and music and emotion, and we highlight relations between music analysis and music psychology. We finally have two or three guest workshops, one in music therapy, one in performance anxiety and one in group improvisation. The module is assessed with weekly reports during semester time (50%) as well as a written examination at the end (50%).

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC404/

Physics and music acoustics

Code: ΜΣ19

Physics and Music Acoustics is an introductory course in understanding the physical structure of sound, its objective and subjective characteristics, as well as the acoustic phenomena that govern the production of sound in musical instruments. The course aims at introducing students to the basic concepts of oscillations and soundwaves through the understanding of oscillations in music systems (string, pipe, membrane, rod) and acoustic phenomena that govern the propagation of sound in space. Finally, the course examines basic chapters of Psychoacoustics and Room Acoustics.

3D audio: evaluation and music creation (Seminar)

Code: Μ304

This seminar is an opportunity for students to immerse themselves in the world of 3D audio reproduction and to deepen their understanding on the technical peculiarities, the methods for recording, production, and reproduction of spatial sound and the human perception-related aspects of 3D audio. During the semester students will use 3D audio technologies creatively and will have to design and participate in 3D audio evaluation experiments.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC443/

Music for Media

Code: ΜΜ04

This unit introduces students to music and audio production for new media, focusing on sound design and production for radio, tv, and the internet. We look at various music production techniques and discuss the theoretical and technical issues which relate to the different means of creation and distribution of music for various platforms. Students are assessed via a portfolio, and student-work is presented and discussed in class in order to stimulate dialogue between all participants.

Room acoustics

Code: ΜΟ56

The course studies the response of closed spaces to audio signals. It teaches students how to identify / predict potential acoustic problems, find solutions, and optimize the listener’s experience in interior listening spaces. It introduces basic acoustic principles and teaches the efficient use of simulation software for the prediction of room acoustics. Upon successful completion, students will be able to identify potential acoustic deficiencies in indoor and suggest improvement actions, based on each room’s preferred use.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC376/

Cognitive musicology – Music language and the mind

Code: ΜΜ43

Cognitive sciences can generally be defined as the sciences who study the mind, the brain, and in general the nature of thinking. This module has thus a multi-disciplinary character and draws material from psychology, philosophy, neurosciences, AI and linguistics. It includes various topics from music cognition, but strong emphasis is given on the parallelism between music and language in many different levels of description. We also discuss the term cognitive musicology as one of the main sectors of systematic musicology. The module is assessed with weekly reports (50%) during term-time, and with a final exam or essay at the end (50%). It is open to all students in the School of Philosophy.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC168/

Creative Technology

Code: Μ230

This unit introduces students to programming environments in order to apply novel sound design techniques for the manipulation of audio using algorithmic processes. It discusses contemporary aesthetic trends and aids the students to apply their skills for the creation of novel works incorporating both instrumental and electronic sources. Students are assessed via a portfolio, and student-work is presented and discussed in class in order to stimulate dialogue between all participants.

Introduction to music technology

Code: ΜΟ90

“Introduction to Music Technology” is an introductory course in the specialization of Music Technology. It introduces students to all scientific topics traditionally treated in this field and provides them with the necessary knowledge and skills. Through this course students are exposed to the following topics: analysis of audio signals, the anatomy of the human vocal and hearing systems, the MIDI and OSC protocols, basic principles of sound recording and music production, production of electronic music scores etc.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC358/

Introduction to electroacoustic music

Code: ΜΜ49

This unit presents the basic aesthetic trends of electroacoustic music from 1950s onwards. It discusses the technological means of each period, the composers, and analyses notable works from the repertoire. It focuses on practical audio techniques, enabling students to have hands-on experience and become familiar with the software for generating and manipulating sound. Upon successful completion of this unit, students will acquire the theoretical tools for understanding the experimental electronic music of the 20th and 21st centuries and will be able to use this knowledge for the creation of contemporary artworks.

Introduction to music programming

Code: Μ232

The course is an introduction to the basic principles of music programming taught through the Max / MSP programming environment. During this course, students acquire algorithmic problem-solving skills and learn how to program their own music / sound routines. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to program algorithms for composing, editing and reproduction of multi-channel audio signals.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC357/

Introduction to sound recording I

Code: ΜΟ84

The course presents the types of microphones according to how they convert sound into electricity and their polar patterns. Stereo recording techniques with laboratory practice are presented at the laboratory’s studio. The types of loudspeakers and the types of boxes that they are placed in to become speakers are presented. The course material aims to introduce students to the basic concepts of sound recording, through its main tools, microphones and speakers and their use. The aim of the course is for students to understand the specifics of microphones and speakers, and to use them through an aesthetic criterion depending on the type of music they will want to record.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC308/

Introduction to sound recording II

Code: ΜΟ85

The course Sound Recording II presents advanced sound recording techniques both in the studio and for live music with laboratory practice, as well as processing, mixing and mastering for a complete and comprehensive knowledge of the subjects of sound recording. The course material aims to deepen students in special concepts and techniques of sound recording. The aim of the course is the understanding by the students of the special techniques and the effective use of them for a perfect aesthetic result.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC309/

Theories of computational music analysis of the 20th/21st centuries

Code: Μ204

This module focuses on seminal theories and methods of music analysis of the last century, such as Schenkerian analysis, Nattiez’ semiotic analysis, the Generative Theory of Tonal Music, as well as Pitch Class Set Theory. Students get to know these theories and then apply them in various works of different eras, but mainly contemporary ones. There is a lot of critical discussion on each theory, as well as the general field of music analysis, and its purpose. If time permits more views are presented such as mathematical music theory, and others. The module is assessed with 50% weekly exercises and 50% a take-home exam.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC403/

Music production for media

Code: Μ301

In this module, the world of creative media and their relationship with the music industry is presented. All the modern tools (software και hardware) available to the contemporary musician to compose music for cinema, games, radio, television, advertising, etc. are presented, as well as techniques for the interaction of music with the moving image image. The role of the contemporary composer for Media is also presented in relation to the other specialties of the music industry with which he is called to collaborate (producers, caretakers, directors, etc.).

Music in the community

Code: Μ237

Music in the Community is concerned with the act of “musicking” and how this can be used in contexts of vulnerable populations. Students learn how to be musicians and facilitators in such challenging contexts. Apart from the classes taking place at the University, students also get practical experience in community placements such as hospitals, psychiatric units, rehabilitation, refugees, and various other minorities’ NGOs. In the theoretical part of the course, special topics in music psychology and neuroscience are discussed, along with elements of music therapy and psychiatry (in collaboration with the Aiginiteion psychiatric hospital). In the University we also work on practical music skills and directions on how to work in large community groups, as well as providing the appropriate support for all the student placements. The module is assessed in two ways: assessment in the placement (50%), and a written report on the whole experience, grounded with appropriate theory (50%).

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC166/

Analysis, processing, and synthesis of audio signals

Code: ΜΟ97

This course offers an overview of all basic elements of sound anatomy, digital audio signal analysis and processing, and sound synthesis techniques. The first part of the course (Audio Analysis) examines the main methodologies of audio signal analysis through the use of specialized software. In the Processing part, common audio signal processing techniques (sound effects) are thoroughly discussed before being put into use. The last part of the course (Sound Synthesis) exposes students to various sound synthesis techniques, commonly used for the creation of unique timbres.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC346/

Sound recording for schools

Code: Μ302

In this module, students acquire the knowledge and skills to successfully operate a sound coverage system in a school environment, with the ultimate goal of successfully organizing and covering school events in primary and secondary education as well as in Music Schools. Basic knowledge of sound recording, audio equipment, wiring and their creative use are presented.

Production of music ensembles

Code: Μ300

In this module, the organization of music ensembles in various musical idioms such as classical, traditional, ethnic and popular music is presented. These ensembles are examined within their musical content, but also at the level of sound recording and music production. Parameters and differentiations amongst them regarding their production are analyzed, concerning both the recording environment in the studio and the live concert environment.

Music industry

Code: ΜΜ15

The course Music Industry presents the evolution of music creation based on the evolution of sound technology in the field of discography and the diffusion of music information. These developments over the last 100 years have created an ecosystem of industrial dimensions, exploiting music creation for the benefit of creators and record companies. The course focuses on music industry history, copyright, music networks, music dissemination and retrieval technologies and new trends in the music industry in the post-digital age.

Music radioart production

Code: Μ255

In this course, theoretical and practical approaches are developed for the creation of an original independent radio show with musicological content. Techniques for the architecture of music shows and radio dramas are also examined in terms of speech, voice selection, music selection, interview content, music investment techniques, and the emergence of a particular musical style. During the course, students are introduced to techniques of sound recording, processing, balancing and preparation of the broadcast material using the special facilities of the studio 310 of the Department.


Byzantine Musicology

Byzantine Musicology

Code: ΜΣ03

In the mind of whoever listens for the very first time to this specific kind of music, i.e. the so-called Byzantine Music, a main question is always arising: what is Byzantine Music finally? Of course, Byzantine Music is the traditional ecclesiastical music of Greek Orthodox Church; nowadays, one can listen to this kind of music in every church all over Greece. But, it isn’t only a Greek music; one can also listen to the same music in all orthodox churches all over the world. That’s why Byzantine Music, not only during the last years but lots of years (even centuries) ago, is adapted into lots of other languages. So, one can listen to the specific sound of Byzantine Music not only in Balkans (i.e. in Albania, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, even in Russia), but also in Europe (in German, French, Finnish and – of course – English language); one can listen to Byzantine Music even in the Arabic or Asian world (and it’s so interesting to listen how Byzantine Music sounds through, for example, Arabic or Korean language). But, beyond all the above, the aforementioned question is rather a philosophical than a musicological one: what Byzantine Music is? One can speak for hours about the tradition, the history, the theory, the technique, the specific musicological rules and the details about the signs and the intervals and the melody of Byzantine Music. Because, Byzantine music is the modal and monophonic Greek music. It extends over two millennia, from the first century of Christianism’s expansion up to the present day. Since the mid-tenth century, Byzantine music is exclusively transmitted by means of a complete and self-contained notation system stemming from Greek alphabet. The relevant musicological research knows and study it through approximately seven thousand musical manuscripts, containing the creations of more than a thousand Byzantine and post-Byzantine composers. One, however, has to undoubtedly focus on the sound of Byzantine Music; and what that sound is? The sound of Byzantine Music is a similar one to “the voice of a soft breeze”, as it is characteristically written to a well-known Old Testament scene, which one can to recall through the following commentary by the Greek author Alexandros Papadiamantis: “… Elias the Prophet witnessed the divine epiphany not in the violent wind, nor in the earthquake and the fire, but in the voice of a soft breeze. And the voice of the soft breeze is the voice of mild Jesus, the voice of the Gospel. This is the reason why the melodist says ‘Let us chant for the sake of mild Jesus.’ And that is why in the Church we must chant with mild voices, with the voice of a soft breeze, and not with loud and discordant voices similar to the violent wind and the earthquake through which God did not reveal Himself ”. So, Byzantine Music is the sound of the soul of somebody who believes in God; somebody who loves God; somebody, in general, who loves people and life. It’s the sound of a full of love heart, the sound of love, the sound of heart, the sound of a sensitive soul; a clear, soft and smooth sound, which can deliver the people in another emotional world, full of nice and real feelings. This is the reason why – as time goes by – Byzantine Music becomes more and more popular all over the world; because it’s something unique, something full of the truth of life, something emotional; a music which can touch the soul of everybody and drive them into another beautiful world.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC249/

Echoi and Eastern Modal Systems

Code: ΜΜ112

The Byzantine Music or “Psaltiki” and the Greek traditional music in general is part of a wider group of musical traditions of the Eastern Mediterranean which have common musical features. One of the greatest targets of the course is the perception of the theoretical analysis in terms and principles that originated in the ancient Greek music theory, evolved during the Byzantine era and disseminated by the interaction with the neighbouring cultures (Arabs, Persians, Ottomans, Slavs, etc.). The most important and extensive part of the Greek theory is the modality, which, in Byzantine Chant tradition that survived until nowadays, is expressed by the so-called Echos. In this course essential elements of the Theory of Psaltic and the Greek traditional music, as well as a basic description of the principal Echos are taught. Notes by the professor provided. The course also uses acoustic psaltic examples.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC267/

Historical overview of Byzantine Music

Code: ΜΜ98

A relatively detailed overview of the course of church music from the first christian times until today. Distinction of two periods in the history of church music: pre-notation and notation. Highlighting the important elements that characterize the pre-notation period, through literary and other historical testimonies. Genesis and evolution of byzantine notation. Musical manuscripts. The genera of byzantine melopoeia and their evolution. Composers and codicographers. Life and work of the main composers and teachers of psaltic art. Modern musicological research. Practical musical examples through live and recorded chants.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/DI288/

Notation of the chanting art

Code: ΜΜ119

The course aims to the presentation of the Byzantine Notation from the mid-10th century to the present day. After the reference to the relevant literature, the following units are discussed: Terminology; the descriptive character of the Byzantine notation; the periods and different evolutional phases of the notation; the process and the criteria of periodization; first period (950-117): early Byzantine notations (Ekphonetic notation, Theta notation, Chartres et Coislin notations, Slavonic notations); second period (1177-1670): Middle Byzantine notation; third period (1670-1814): Transitional phase of the Byzantine notation: from the Middle to the Analytical notation; fourth period (1814-present day): the so called New Analytical notation; other notational types. The course is supported by presentation and study of several examples of Byzantine and post-Byzantine musical manuscripts.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC175/

Byzantine and Latin Chant relations

Code: ΜΜ70

The course focusses on the interrelation between Byzantine and Latin Church music. The following units are discussed: Byzantine and Latin modal systems: convergence and divergence points. The liturgical-musical manuscripts and the related Offices in Byzantium and the West. Byzantine influences on the Latin liturgical Chant (South Italy). Influences of the Latin Chant on the Byzantine one in Venetian ruled areas (Crete and Cyprus): the historical frame; local tradition and ritual; religious identities; compositional and liturgical practices; liturgical texts; compositional features; specific ritual practices.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC264/

Byzantine and post-Byzantine Melopoeia

Code: ΜΟ41

Nowadays, one – obviously – understands what a composer and a chanter means: the composer is the one who has the “creative state” and therefore the “capability to construct a chant, by inventing and writing new chants that are pleasing to his audience”, whereas the chanter is just the one who is called to “recite this chant”, to sing, to perform “various long known psalmodies”. Precisely what results from Chrysanthos’s relevant writings in his Great Theory of Music [§ 389]: “Melopoeia is the power to create melos. We create melos not just by chanting different long known psalmodies, but also by inventing and writing our own new mele pleasing to the listeners. Melopoeia, therefore, differs from melos-singing because the latter is the recitation of melos, while melopoeia is a poetic state”. Nevertheless, one realizes that many more latent skills are needed in both cases, which may be misunderstood or unknown to people nowadays: the real chanter should also be characterized by other special talents just as the real composer should have a full knowledge of and should constantly follow some specific rules. Nowadays, all these have been weakened; the criteria have been relaxed for a long time now. It is common, today, to characterize someone as a composer or chanter without much thought. At all events, one needs to be much more careful and (even) more cautious in both cases. By the 15th century, monk Gabriel had already thought that it was advisable to “picture the perfect chanter” [verses 696-726]. He set, therefore, six criteria, which “should be met by any chanter who does not want to contradict his reputation” [verses 585-6]. Three of them are connected with the use of the notation: A knowledge of the musical notation’s “dictation” | A capability to write music without the use of any reference book | An immediate (and flawless) transcribing of any music heard. Whereas, only two of them refer to the chanter’s vocal capabilities: tonally correct vocal placement | euphony. Moreover, it is remarkable that the ability to compose new melodies is included among the talents of a chanter. Manuel Chrysaphes [verses 176-96], agrees with Gabriel’s observations; he is additionally describing both the chanter and the composer [verses 197-212], by saying: “The man who is skilled in the science and capable of using these aforementioned six categories as the art requires, is now a perfect teacher: let him compose and write and teach and, make judgments, let him discourse on his own and others’ works, especially the latter. For he will create his own compositions following the art while others will pass judgments on them, since partiality prevents an unbiased judgment and he is inevitably partial to his own works regardless of their true quality. If he does not possess knowledge of these categories and is unable to use them, then he should be silent, because it is better and surer than not being silent. Or, if he does not wish to be silent – and this is entirely his own decision – he should not try to criticize the work of other composers, knowing that he will not be able to persuade even a fool such as himself to take on his attitudes willingly and to think as he himself thinks”.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC248/

Byzantine music and Western notational systems

Code: ΜΜ72

The course focusses on the transcription of the Byzantine chant to other notational systems. Several units are included, as the relation between different systems of notation between East and West, the possibility and/or necessity of transcription of Byzantine chant in staff notation, the problems connected. The course is completed by several exercises of trancrition.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC263/

Theory and Praxis of Psaltic Art I

Code: ΜΜ66

The theoretical principals used by the Psaltic are the main subject being taught at this course, with emphasis on basic terms such as modality, intervals, production and discriminations of multi-modal subcategories, theory of the main Echos. As a fundamental enchiridion is suggested the Mega Theoreticon by Chrysanthos, and complementary notes are provided.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC254/

Theory and Praxis of Psaltic Art II

Code: ΜΜ71

In succession of the course THEORY AND PRACTICE OF THE PSALTIC ART I, this course examines thoroughly the modal analysis of the Echos and their Elements. A wide and rich range of examples and references to parallel modal Easterly Systems are used. Notes by the professor are provided.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC268/

History of Byzantine Μusic I

Code: ΜΜ124

Historical stations of psaltic art from the 10th century until today, as defined by great events and realizations, characteristic phases and gradual changes in writing, form and style, but also pioneering creators. Presentation of the life and work of the main composers up to the 15th century, with the collection of various testimonies from the manuscript sources. Practical musical examples, through recorded chants, followed by comments on their melodic form. Student research in musical manuscripts and catalogs of music codes. Collection and classification of the compositions of the composers of the examined period.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC294/

History of Byzantine Μusic IΙ

Code: ΜΜ125

The period of conservation and music decentralization. The musical action in Crete and Cyprus during the 15th and 16th century. Preparation and new great glimpse of psaltic art (1580-1720/30). Musical reconstruction, reform processes, melodic and semantic renewal. Attempts to replace the standard notation system with other pentagrams or alphabets (1730-1820). Recent history (1820-present). Practical musical examples, through recorded chants, followed by comments on their melodic form. Student research in musical manuscripts and catalogs of music codes. Collection and classification of the compositions of the composers of the examined period.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC298/

Secular Repertory in Byzantine Parasemantike

Code: ΜΜ111

By using the notation of the Byzantine Music, an important volume of secular repertory was set down, apart from the Psaltic pieces. This repertory mostly concerns the so-called Learned (“savant”) Music of Constantinople, in Arabo-persian forms, and so far it counts more or less 4.500 pages of records on the manuscripts of Psaltike, and almost 2.500 pages of printed editions. Moreover , the school ditty repertory was set down towards the end of the 19th century, and a considerable amount of records particularly in the 20th century regards the Greek folk song. This material, except for its importance concerning both the study of the Greek music History and the relation between the Psaltiki and the secular species of music, is nowadays a prominent source for the peripheral tradition of the Eastern Mediterranean, in terms of antiquity and data availability. In the class there will be a presentation of the most important sources as well as specific issues which come in, such as Historical Musicology,Theory and “Exegesis” of secular compositions from the Old Parasemantice. Notes by the professor are provided.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC253/

Worship and music in Byzantium

Code: ΜΜ59

Genesis and evolution of christian worship. Liturgical types. Euchologia and Typika. Typical layouts in musical manuscripts. Liturgical and music books. The basic music codes according to the three genres of music and the liturgical books in which the content of the music books is scattered. Liturgical-musicological examination and commentary on the Liturgies of the Byzantine type and the two richest in hymnography akolouthiai of the monastic Typikon. The byzantine Typikon of the Great Church and its akolouthiai. Chanting interactions between the monastic and asmatikon Typikon. Liturgical and psaltic terminology.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/DI287/

Palaeography of Byzantine notation II

Code: Μ198

The course focuses mainly on the Middle Byzantine Notation studying the following units: Byzantines’ “oral” parts of the musical teaching (interpretation of the formulae, modes); the formulaic character of the Byzantine chant; the relation between the shape, the name and the function of the formulae and the liturgical text. The phenomenon of ‘kallopismos’ (embellishment/re-treatment) of chants as a renewal of the Byzantine chants (15th-17th c.); evolution of the Middle notation through the phenomenon of embellishment; study and comparison of the evolutional phases of embellished chants based on musical manuscripts of the period. Transitional notation of ‘exēgēsis’ (ca. 1670-1814); evolutional phases; relation between different ‘exēgēseis’; “exēgēsis” and transcription.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC329/

Palaeography of Byzantine Notation I

Code: ΜΟ48

The course aims to the study of Byzantine notations from the mid-10th century onwards and of the various stages of their evolutional process. The following units are presented: Byzantine notations symbolic character; philosophy and principals; terminology; origin of the Byzantine notations; Byzantine and Western neumatic notations; Early Byzantine Notations (ca. 950-1177): Lectionary or ‘ekphonetic’ notation, Chartres/Coislin notation, Theta notation, Slavonic notations; characteristics-evolution-transcriptions. Middle Byzantine notation (1177- ca. 1670): From ‘adiastematic’ to ‘diastematic’ notation; Byzantines’ teaching booklet (‘Protheoria’); Middle Notation descriptive character; interval signs/great signs - formulae; Byzantine treatises.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC285/

Pre-Theory (‘Protheoria’) of the Byzantine Music I

Code: ΜΜ105

The so-called pre-Theory (‘Protheoria’) of the Byzantine Music is a sort theoretical text addressed to those who want to learn the Art of Chanting; it is enriched with relative pedagogical musical exercises and methods of learning individual musical phrases; it is also accompanied with some very interesting schemes aiming to support the teaching of the theory of the Art; studying such a text, without overlooking the musical practice itself (both in the version of its written and – especially – oral aspects), one can ascertain that all the aforementioned musical material meet as a whole at a triptych of great importance; a triptych the aspects of which do not appear to be associated at the up to date registered relative bibliography; particularly, this triptych includes: the text (either in its oral or written version), i.e. the theoretical description of a musical phenomenon, that could be considered as the version of musicology), the shape, i.e. a symbol, which describes – graphically – the same musical phenomenon itself, and of course the music, mainly at the type of several notated exercises, through the performance of which not only the appropriate chanting preparation can be achieved but also the more specified analysis of every musical phenomenon; actually, this triptych is a sequence of data that can complete each other, data which (even if it is not always provided and moreover, in most cases, it isn’t implied either) contributes to a substantial knowledge of Byzantine Music theory and practice.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC250/

Pre-Theory (‘Protheoria’) of the Byzantine Music II

Code: ΜΜ106

The so-called pre-Theory (‘Protheoria’) of the Byzantine Music is a sort theoretical text addressed to those who want to learn the Art of Chanting; it is enriched with relative pedagogical musical exercises and methods of learning individual musical phrases; it is also accompanied with some very interesting schemes aiming to support the teaching of the theory of the Art; studying such a text, without overlooking the musical practice itself (both in the version of its written and – especially – oral aspects), one can ascertain that all the aforementioned musical material meet as a whole at a triptych of great importance; a triptych the aspects of which do not appear to be associated at the up to date registered relative bibliography; particularly, this triptych includes: the text (either in its oral or written version), i.e. the theoretical description of a musical phenomenon, that could be considered as the version of musicology), the shape, i.e. a symbol, which describes – graphically – the same musical phenomenon itself, and of course the music, mainly at the type of several notated exercises, through the performance of which not only the appropriate chanting preparation can be achieved but also the more specified analysis of every musical phenomenon; actually, this triptych is a sequence of data that can complete each other, data which (even if it is not always provided and moreover, in most cases, it isn’t implied either) contributes to a substantial knowledge of Byzantine Music theory and practice.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC280/

Psaltic Art and Hellenic Demotic Music

Code: ΜΜ99

The musical relationship between the two fields has been noted many times in the past. Having considered briefly the points of contact between the two areas (language, variety of intervals, modality, synthesis’s techniques, anthropological factors etc.) and the main differences (use of instruments, secular or not character, a variety of local traditions etc.), the depth and the extent of this relationship with the criterion of modal analysis is further explored. Focusing on basic divisions and branches of Oktaechia, representative pieces of folk music of the major local Greek traditions are respectively modally analyzed. Relevant audio material and recordings are utilized.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC240/

Psaltic Art and Modern Hellenic Urban Popular Music

Code: ΜΜ101

A large part of modern Greek urban folk music shows relationship with the Byzantine music. We detect the individual items and points of contact regarding this relationship in a diachronic examination divided in periods by significant changes (Asia Minor disaster, predominance of bouzouki, appearance of special musical currents, such as “rebetiko, artistic, political” song, etc.). By using the tool of modal analysis, we attempts to localize the more closely related repertoire to the core of the Byzantine Oktaechia’s modal characteristics. Use relevant audio material and recordings are being utilized.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC239/

Byzantine Notation Orthography

Code: ΜΜ104

In order for one to write down through Byzantine Notation, much information is essential. Scholars could speak most extensively about them, based on the written, but primarily the oral tradition of the Byzantine Music. It is a matter of the essentials of Byzantine notation. It has to indicatively be noted that the interest of the researcher should, of course, be focused on two elements: firstly, on the signs that support the repetition of each syllable of the poetic text and secondly on the signs that extend the timing of the chanted syllable of any musical text. Word and melos, poetry and music, are the essentials of Byzantine music. Thus, there exist concrete signs that are inserted into any musical text, signs that serve to enlarge the texts, not only the poetic (repetition of the syllable), but also the musical (augmented, extended time). These signs are the essentials of Byzantine notation. Analytically, regarding the repetition of the syllable, the following signs are used in Byzantine Notation: kentemata, hyporrhoe & bareia, while for the extension of time the following signs are respectively used: tzakisma (or klasma) & diple [oxeia]. There exist, of course, other combinations of two or more energies worthy of attention (that are always applied at the point where the syllable of a poetic text is repeated), as, for example, the antikenoma with the aple or the syndesmos (which was called the heteron parakalesma). The observations that indicatively are pointed out, have no other aim than to broadly describe the way one could desirably use the Byzantine Notation in order to write down any melody.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC256/

Byzantine Choir I

Code: Μ261

In the broader ecclesiastic tradition (mainly in Scripture) but also in the relevant literature (especially in the sources of Liturgical, Typical or even Canon Law) there are numerous testimonies about the action of choir performance. Nevertheless, any thorough researcher of the history of choral music might, with reason, claim that the practice of choir performance constitutes nothing less than a “hidden mystery”. Issues such as the practical organization, the specific structure, the proper teaching and the systematic directing of a choir of chanters, or even the technique of choir performance, remain (in their details) musicologically undefined. However, the following detailed account (by monk Gabriel, a Byzantine theorist of Psaltic Art) on the ideal way of kalophonic (i.e. monophonic) psaltic performance presents us with something of specific musicological (but also purely psaltic) interest [verses 610-95]; in this account are also incorporated some useful pieces of information about the assistants of the soloist, revealing some specified practical instructions concerning the formation of a musical ensemble, albeit a reduced one, i.e. a rudimentary chanters’ choir: “It is also important to have with you one or two assistants, but definitely no more than that; otherwise, this would not be a kalophony, but a choral ensemble. But this can be achieved only if the voices are nice and fitting. Now, if the voice of the chanter is not of that kind, he must hire assistants. All chanters have to be familiar with each other and to study in advance each other’s’ parts; in this way, their voices will be in accord and the chant will sound more melodious. You should never take as an assistant a person with an unpleasant voice; indeed, it is better for you to chant alone than accompanied by such a person, because in that case you will lose your own melodic charm. Now, the voice of the discordant and the cacophonous is either stony and faster than it should normally be, or feeble and distorted. And if somebody’s voice is stony, it rises higher than is normal even against his will, whilst if it is feeble, it unwillingly goes lower. Such a person should be shunned, since their predicament is not confined to themselves alone, but is transmitted to all of us, making our voices drift either higher or lower…” The scarcity of primary sources prevents us from perceiving the historical background of the technical details of choir performance; it is this very scarcity that reveals the true nature of Psaltic Art: the singular way of the functioning of its constitutive elements (such as notation, sounds, rhythm, etc.) creates practical particularities precisely of that kind that must be dealt with very carefully during choir performance. These particularities cannot always be recorded theoretically in all detail; nevertheless, a second reading of the selected theoretical testimonies, clearly delivers a rough sketch of the details of any attempt for choir performance.

Byzantine Choir II

Code: Μ241

In the broader ecclesiastic tradition (mainly in Scripture) but also in the relevant literature (especially in the sources of Liturgical, Typical or even Canon Law) there are numerous testimonies about the action of choir performance. Nevertheless, any thorough researcher of the history of choral music might, with reason, claim that the practice of choir performance constitutes nothing less than a “hidden mystery”. Issues such as the practical organization, the specific structure, the proper teaching and the systematic directing of a choir of chanters, or even the technique of choir performance, remain (in their details) musicologically undefined. However, the following detailed account (by monk Gabriel, a Byzantine theorist of Psaltic Art) on the ideal way of kalophonic (i.e. monophonic) psaltic performance presents us with something of specific musicological (but also purely psaltic) interest [verses 610-95]; in this account are also incorporated some useful pieces of information about the assistants of the soloist, revealing some specified practical instructions concerning the formation of a musical ensemble, albeit a reduced one, i.e. a rudimentary chanters’ choir: “It is also important to have with you one or two assistants, but definitely no more than that; otherwise, this would not be a kalophony, but a choral ensemble. But this can be achieved only if the voices are nice and fitting. Now, if the voice of the chanter is not of that kind, he must hire assistants. All chanters have to be familiar with each other and to study in advance each other’s’ parts; in this way, their voices will be in accord and the chant will sound more melodious. You should never take as an assistant a person with an unpleasant voice; indeed, it is better for you to chant alone than accompanied by such a person, because in that case you will lose your own melodic charm. Now, the voice of the discordant and the cacophonous is either stony and faster than it should normally be, or feeble and distorted. And if somebody’s voice is stony, it rises higher than is normal even against his will, whilst if it is feeble, it unwillingly goes lower. Such a person should be shunned, since their predicament is not confined to themselves alone, but is transmitted to all of us, making our voices drift either higher or lower…” The scarcity of primary sources prevents us from perceiving the historical background of the technical details of choir performance; it is this very scarcity that reveals the true nature of Psaltic Art: the singular way of the functioning of its constitutive elements (such as notation, sounds, rhythm, etc.) creates practical particularities precisely of that kind that must be dealt with very carefully during choir performance. These particularities cannot always be recorded theoretically in all detail; nevertheless, a second reading of the selected theoretical testimonies, clearly delivers a rough sketch of the details of any attempt for choir performance.


Music Pedagogy

Music Education I

Code: ΜΣ79

The subject covers a wide area within music education. Learning and teaching theories and their application in music teaching represents the core of this subject. Emphasis is placed on the music teacher’s role, as well as the music curriculum and Music’s place in Greek education. Practical examples of lesson planning and music activities for different ages and educational levels are presented throughout the semester. Teaching approaches include lecture, workshops, projects and collaborative learning in small groups, in order to connect theory with practice throughout the semester. Group visits to selected schools for music lessons and classroom observations are organized whenever it is possible. This class is mandatory for the acquisition of the pedagogical and teaching accreditation.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC209/

Integrative approaches in music teaching

Code: ΜΟ83

The contemporary trend for integration in teaching and learning is explored through theoretical and philosophical views as well as practical applications in Greece and the world. Different opinions, problems, strengths and weaknesses are identified with specific examples of models and applications of integration in music and the other arts in USA, UK and Europe. Particular emphasis is placed on the current curriculum for music in primary and secondary education in Greece and its integrative characteristics. This class is mandatory for the acquisition of the pedagogical and teaching accreditation.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC229/

Music in the early years

Code: Μ298

Recently, the technological and research advances enable us to gain more information about our development from pregnancy. Our hearing ability is already developed in the 2nd trimester of pregnancy and research shows that its utilization after birth becomes important for the subsequent musical development. This course will address issues related to infants' musical abilities, the role of music in infancy (up to 30 months), the theory of music learning (musical aptitude, musical ability), the characteristics of infant "song" and its categories, the planning of activities for this age group and methods of organising a music “lesson” with parents and infants.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC447/

Music Education II

Code: ΜΟ60

This subject includes an overview of music teaching methods from ancient times until today with an emphasis on 20th and 21st century approaches. More particularly the methods of Kodaly, Dalcroze and Orff are described in detail with practical examples and activities. The importance and impact of various music teaching methods throughout the centuries for today’s music classroom are explored. Teaching approaches include lecture, workshops, projects and collaborative learning in small groups, in order to connect theory with practice throughout the semester. Group visits to selected schools for music lessons and classroom observations are organized whenever it is possible. This class is mandatory for the acquisition of the pedagogical and teaching accreditation.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC216/

Group music play in formal and informal contexts

Code: Μ297

The organisation of a music group either in a formal or an informal setting offers significant advantages to its participants. Regardless of their previous musical knowledge and experience, the cognitive development and, the sense of "belonging" are fundamental features, that the teacher or the facilitator should take into account. Through the lens of differentiated and integrated instruction, the main issues that will be examined are the following: approaches of organizing and managing musical groups in formal and informal framework, orchestration ideas of a song or any other music part, body percussion techniques and performing musical instruments such as ukulele, recorder (soprano / alto / tenoro), ocarina, boomwhackers. All these elements will facilitate any kind of group to become an “orchestra”.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC446/

Teaching Practice I

Code: Μ206

This is one of the two subjects through which students complete their teaching practice in schools. During the fall semester students follow a number of obligatory classes at the University where they review concepts and issues related to music teaching and learning through practical applications. They develop practical skills related to lesson planning, observation, reflection, planning for creative music activities, etc. This subject is assessed through a literature review-based essay. This class is mandatory for the acquisition of the pedagogical and teaching accreditation.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC301/

Teaching Practice II

Code: Μ207

This is the second subject that students need in order to complete their teaching practice in schools. Parallely to the University classes, students select the schools in which they will complete their observation and teaching. In collaboration with the University professor and selected music teachers/mentors in public and private schools, they are obliged to complete 9 hours observation and 1 hour teaching in a primary school, 9 hours observation and 1 hour teaching in a secondary school and 9 hours observation and 1 hour teaching in a special Music School. Students are assessed through a portfolio which includes observation forms (for each hour of observation in each school), reflection journal for each hour of observation, lesson plan and self-assessment). This class is mandatory for the acquisition of the pedagogical and teaching accreditation.

eclass: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MUSIC301/